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# Sunday, 13 December 2009

When a company is acquired by another, some sort of restructuring is inevitable. As Delver’s acquisition by Sears Holdings became reality, it was also obvious that significant changes were required to how we operate. The first and most pronounced of these changes was that our social (or socially-connected, if you’re picky) search engine, the first product of its kind – we have enough ego to kick ourselves hard now that Google’s version is out – was scrapped, and the entire team was put to work on a new product for Sears Holdings. This, of course, meant restructuring the R&D team.

One of our tenants at Delver was that everything is open to interpretation, critique and improvement. As an R&D team we were always relentlessly self-improving; I believe my two years at Delver were perhaps the best I have ever experienced professionally. I’m happy to say that this approach still prevails under Sears Holdings, and we’ve taken the first few months under the new management for some serious introspection, trying to learn everything we can from the mistakes we made while still working under the Delver banner. I believe the organization has improved across the board with these sessions, resulting in significant improvements to everything from recruiting, HR and managerial processes to source control, configuration and release management. But as a developer I felt I was hitting a professional plateau.

As the new product’s specs took shape I was initially meant to take charge of the search engine implementation, continuing my original position at Delver. After nearly two years of working on search it became obvious to me that it is a very broad and nontrivial domain, and that to do a good job I will have to truly specialize in search. While I knew I did not want to continue working on the search engine, I also knew that the other developer positions would not satisfy me. While the product was being specified I kept busy with tasks that were not directly related with the product itself: setting up an integration testing framework (not trivial with a system comprising both Java and .NET components, and which integrates a significant number of 3rd party products), defining various development processes like version and branch guidelines, and finally implementing a proper Java build system that still drives our builds today. The common ground here is that, for the most part, the greatest enjoyment was derived from doing stuff that’s “horizontal”, that crosses components and teams and sort of binds the entire development effort together. With this in mind I approached my bosses at Sears and, after prolonged discussions, we came up with the title of Application Engineer:

 

An application engineer, in Sears parlance at any rate, bridges the gap between R&D and IT (or rather, the support, deployment and administrative teams). Essentially, where R&D (and QA) ends, the app engineer’s role begins: the app engineer is directly responsible for the smooth operation of the production system. This means that the app engineer must not only be fully versed in the system architecture and inner workings, but must also be an active participant in defining it. Wherever there is an overlap between R&D and IT is where you will find the app engineer: front-end server farms, logging and profiling requirements, log aggregation and reporting, system monitoring (which suddenly not only includes health, but applicative counters that must be correctly specified and monitored), deployment and troubleshooting processes etc. Having been assigned this role for the past few months I’ve reached the conclusion that an app engineer is a cross between IT-oriented system architect and system administrator, walking a fine line between a developer and a system adminstrator. I certainly hope I don’t fall off!

Sunday, 13 December 2009 14:54:30 (Jerusalem Standard Time, UTC+02:00)  #    -
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